Sunday, June 28, 2020

Everything Graduate Applicants Need to Know About the Curriculum Vitae (CV)

If you’re applying to an academic graduate program (MA, PhD), no doubt you’ll be asked to submit a CV or resume. While â€Å"resume† is the term most often used in common parlance, there is a huge difference between CVs and resumes, and there are important reasons for choosing the CV instead of the resume. Let’s walk through the differences between these two formats. What’s the difference between a resume and CV? Resume A resume is a very concise record of your current and past work, achievements, and credentials. Most resumes never exceed two pages maximum and are very tightly geared to the specific job you are applying to. So, if you are applying for a job in IT, it would probably be a waste of a precious line on your resume to include that you were on the college swim team; it would, however, be imperative that you include your participation in the computer science club in college, as that is pertinent to your hoped-for job. CV A curriculum vitae, often used in applying to graduate programs or positions within academia, should be similarly tailored to the particular program or job to which you’re applying, but you do not have a space limit; in fact, generally, the longer the CV, the better! There is one important caveat to this, however: A long CV should only have information that is broadly related to the work you want to do. You can assume that your reader will review all of it, even if certain parts – e.g., your former education credentials – might be considered more seriously than other sections. CVs in academia One of the reasons for the prevalence of CVs in academia is the CV’s malleability, that is, the ease with which you can add a section, reorganize sections, and, well, keep it growing. There is, however, such a thing as â€Å"too much of a good thing.† I once had a professor with a sixty-page CV, which included, among his â€Å"publications,† not only the books he’d written, but every opinion piece or â€Å"letter to the editor† he’d ever written to The  New York Times! The beauty of the CV in this case is that this professor certainly had the flexibility to add as much material as he wanted; however, especially if you are beginning your graduate career, it is best to choose wisely what you include on a CV. What should you include in your CV? So, what practical advice is there for putting together a CV? Here are sections you should consider including: Educational background (prior schooling post-high school, in reverse chronological order), degrees/certificates earned Research experience (short description, name of professor and institution, dates of work) Teaching experience (if you have any – and no worries if you don’t! This section will become increasingly populated during and after graduate school.) Professional experience (if applicable) Awards and honors Languages (if applicable, list in descending order from those in which you are fluentproficientelementary/reading knowledge) Publications Bottom line CVs (and resumes) are not the sort of things you will spend time learning to write in your usual English or literature class. Schools always â€Å"assume† their students miraculously know how to put these sorts of documents together. But here at Accepted, we have the experience to help you put together a stellar CV that is geared toward the schools and programs you’re applying to. Whether you need someone to look over your CV and provide feedback, or if you’ve never put a CV together and don’t know where to begin, the expert advisors at Accepted are available to discuss your past experiences and other sorts of relevant information for your stellar CV. Explore our Resume/CV Services to learn more. By Rachel Slutsky who has as served as a writing tutor, consultant, and adjunct professor teaching writing. Rachel has assisted applicants in applying to an array of MBA and graduate programs. She earned her masters from the University of Chicago and is currently pursuing her PhD at Harvard University.  Want Rachel to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch! Related Resources: †¢ Get Your Game On: A Free Guide to Applying to Grad School †¢ How to Write the Qualifications Summary for Your Resume †¢ 18 Do’s And Don’ts For Your Application Resume

Thursday, June 4, 2020

Environmental Law Kyoto Treaty Essay - 275 Words

Environmental Law Kyoto Treaty (Essay Sample) Content: Environmental Law- Kyoto TreatyName:Institution:Environmental Law- Kyoto TreatyIntroductionHuman activities, especially the combustion of fossil fuels as well as huge-scale transformation of land cover has an effect on the ecosystems all over the world. Temperature changes, precipitation, as well as water chemistry are changing the environment. These alterations also affect environmental frameworks of regulations, either by rendering them unsuccessful or forcing them to acclimatize to attain their goals under varying conditions (Hansen Pyke, 2007, 2). Various environmental laws have had success while others have failed or need to be changed. One such example is the Kyoto protocol, which is in need of change.The Kyoto TreatyThe Kyoto treaty was the firstglobal international agreement on how to deal with climate change as well as a vital tool those governments used globally since its enactment into law in 2005. One hundred eighty three countries by 2009 had signed up fo r the treaty and had made commitments to reducing their carbon wastes and other greenhouse gasses (Makarenko, 2007, 1). Several countries set their own goals and in so doing realized that their reduction emissions were not decreasing and that much more needed to be done.Stoppage of Climate changeThe main objective of the Kyoto protocol was containing greenhouse gasses at reasonable levels that would stop changes within the climate system of the planet.Different responsibilities but same problemThe Kyoto protocol accepted that they were similar problems but not all countries contributed similarly to the problem.CriticismAustralia and the United States originally opted out of the Kyoto treaty because of granted exemption to India, China and developing countries. Many countries criticized the Kyoto protocol because its mechanism formed a carbon marketplace, whereby credits of carbon could be transacted (Makarenko, 2007, 1). This allowed richer countries to avoid reducing their emission s and sometimes disguise an increment.ConclusionThe Kyoto pro... Environmental Law Kyoto Treaty Essay - 275 Words Environmental Law Kyoto Treaty (Essay Sample) Content: Environmental Law- Kyoto TreatyName:Institution:Environmental Law- Kyoto TreatyIntroductionHuman activities, especially the combustion of fossil fuels as well as huge-scale transformation of land cover has an effect on the ecosystems all over the world. Temperature changes, precipitation, as well as water chemistry are changing the environment. These alterations also affect environmental frameworks of regulations, either by rendering them unsuccessful or forcing them to acclimatize to attain their goals under varying conditions (Hansen Pyke, 2007, 2). Various environmental laws have had success while others have failed or need to be changed. One such example is the Kyoto protocol, which is in need of change.The Kyoto TreatyThe Kyoto treaty was the firstglobal international agreement on how to deal with climate change as well as a vital tool those governments used globally since its enactment into law in 2005. One hundred eighty three countries by 2009 had signed up fo r the treaty and had made commitments to reducing their carbon wastes and other greenhouse gasses (Makarenko, 2007, 1). Several countries set their own goals and in so doing realized that their reduction emissions were not decreasing and that much more needed to be done.Stoppage of Climate changeThe main objective of the Kyoto protocol was containing greenhouse gasses at reasonable levels that would stop changes within the climate system of the planet.Different responsibilities but same problemThe Kyoto protocol accepted that they were similar problems but not all countries contributed similarly to the problem.CriticismAustralia and the United States originally opted out of the Kyoto treaty because of granted exemption to India, China and developing countries. Many countries criticized the Kyoto protocol because its mechanism formed a carbon marketplace, whereby credits of carbon could be transacted (Makarenko, 2007, 1). This allowed richer countries to avoid reducing their emission s and sometimes disguise an increment.ConclusionThe Kyoto pro...

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Do Objects Make Us - Free Essay Example

Sample details Pages: 3 Words: 856 Downloads: 2 Date added: 2017/09/22 Category Advertising Essay Type Argumentative essay Did you like this example? Do Objects Make Us? Many people in todays society are distressed greatly with ones rank in the social hierarchy; material possessions of all sorts seem to construct, shape, and style the lives of consumers all over the world. Consumers all over the world are becoming more and more demanding as more and more is being advertised. Many companies, such as Apple, often advertise months in advance for products creating commotion, attentiveness, and desire among the world. Stores, such as Old Navy, inspire consumers to shop at stores like theirs to feel pleased and satisfied with how much can be bought with such small amounts of money; when in reality, the consumers are spending money on their identity. In â€Å"On sale at Old Navy: Cool clothes for identical zombies! †, Damien Cave uncovers the fact that retailers all over the world, especially in such establishments as Old Navy and Ikea, have began to take up the lives of consumers in todays society and have created a great deal of trickery for making consumers believe they need more than they actually do. Naomi Klein states that consumers are being scammed. Many consumers are being judged by what they buy and where they buy it. Many people, such as Thomas Frank feel that stores such as Old Navy create almost a â€Å"mass cloning masked in a carnival of diversity† (Cave). That analysis may seem true but consumers should take into account that they are letting objects define who they are leading to a materialistic lifestyle. Nowadays, people, especially teens, are very concerned with appearance, prestige, and social position. Malls all over the world are jam packed with a great quantity of stores with the same goal as stores like Old Navy and Ikea. Stores such as Old Navy and Gap often pressure and persuade teens to feel the need to purchase â€Å"the next big thing† in order for them to be viewed as â€Å"cool† by the rest of the society. Teens in todays society will p ay extra for clothes at one specific store to create a certain image for themselves. It is only human to want to feel accepted- and to even have the want to feel envied. Many people in todays world would rather be dressed nicely, put together and have some debt than wear shaggy, aged, out f date fashion. I am not excluding myself from this category, however; America has been shaped and molded to be consumers. This generation of american culture is letting the objects they buy define who they are as a person and citizen. In â€Å"iPad Envy†, Rob Walker argues that people are often obsessed with the thought of being the first to have new state-of-the-art technology. Technology-seeking people like this are the first ones to pre-order advertised products even though they at risk of many complications and uncertainty of perfect product performance. These â€Å"technology-seeking† are letting objects such as technology to define them. They will pay more for similar techno logy to get the brand they want others to associate them with. Although Rob Walker states that these people should be thanked for their ignorance; consumers need to take a step back and look at the situation they are in. Consumers should ask themselves, â€Å"Do I really need this? †. Walker also brings up the fact that they are often guinea pigs for buying this technology and that they are often getting ripped off. Rob Walker stated in his article that an estimate of 200,000 people pre-ordered the Apple iPad paying $500- $700. Many people believe that like the iPhone, once the glitches and flaws are fixed, the products price will decrease. This approach of marketing helps keep more and more people interested in the products. I once heard someone say, â€Å"You do not own an Apple iPad, it owns you†. This saying proves that people sometimes get so wrapped up in material possessions, they soon are too crazed that their life is slowly but surely evolving into a materi alistic lifestyle. The point of these articles is for consumers to ask themselves: â€Å"Why do I need the most expensive and newest product? † Eventually there will be a time when that product will be â€Å"out of style† and consumers will want the next best thing. These two articles are perfect examples of how the American society views â€Å"to need† versus â€Å"to want†. To earn respect one should be a hardworking and loyal individual. The materials you own mean nothing without respectable morals and ideals. Our generation is under the impression that they need to consume more and more expensive products in rder to define a lasting self-image. However, this mind set will eventually be the downfall to self realization. If one is unable to form opinions on their own, they will never become an individual and will ultimately fail to create a self-image. If our generation continues to let object define them, it we will remain ill-fated to live material istic and acquisitive lifestyles. Works Cited Cave, Damien. â€Å"On sale at Old Navy: Cool clothes for identical zombies! † Salon. com. Salon Media Group, 22 Nov. 2000. Web 7 June 2010. Walker, Rob. â€Å"iPad Envy† New York Times. New York Times, 5 April 2010. Web 30 June 2010. Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "Do Objects Make Us" essay for you Create order

Sunday, May 17, 2020

Should Gambling Be Legalized - 1401 Words

Gambling is an activity as old as civilization with as many varied forms and practices. From betting on cock fights to Presidential elections, gambling finds itself in a consistent battle with various cultures. No other gambling activity is as popular or as controversial as lotteries. In the United States, gambling had long been illegal. That is largely due to the Christian origins of most state legislation. Of which, the traditional view saw gambling as evil. Over time, more progressive individuals in the United States pursued relieving the strict laws on gambling. Gradually these measures succeeded in areas, but remained stalled in the traditionally religious southern states. In a renewed effort to expand into the wall of resistance. Lawmakers and lobbyists repackaged the lottery as an education lottery. A system in which the proceeds will benefit the school systems. Using this measure of marketing, they were successful in their goals. Now in most states there exist a state sanctioned lottery of some kind. There exist large amounts of empirical evidence establishing the argument that lotteries assist in upward wealth redistribution and disproportionately affects low income individuals. Furthermore, there are audits that have shown that the education portion of lotteries has been neglected. In some states, those audits have shown that not even a single dollar was given in support of the state education system. For the purposes of this paper, the basis will examine aShow MoreRelatedGambling Should be Legalized.1571 Words   |  7 PagesGambling should be legalized What is gambling? According to www.dictionary.com gambling is taking a risk in the hope of gaining an advantage or a benefit. Gambling has been around for centuries and has been dated way back to 1492. People have been gambling in America ever since America was found. There are numerous underground cards clubs and casinos all over the country and in major cities. People gamble on everything: sports evens, dice, and cards. Even though people gamble every day in the UnitedRead MoreShould Gambling Be Legalized?971 Words   |  4 PagesToday, gambling is not allowed in some countries, but it is legal only in some areas in the United States. Some people are in favor of gambling because they find their entertainment in playing in casinos. Gambling is to take risks and play the games for money. Most people believe that gambling should not be legal because gambling activities do not benefit our communities and eventually causes: increased taxes, a loss of jobs and money. However, my opp onents believe that gambling and casinos areRead MoreShould Gambling Be Legalized?4078 Words   |  17 PagesShould Gambling Be Legalized? Over the past twenty or so years, great wealth and improved economic and social conditions have been promised to the communities that have embraced legalized gambling. However, with twenty years of experience it is time to look back and analyze whether this is true or not. It could easily be said that gambling is as American as apple pie. Gambling has shaped American history since its beginning. Lotteries were used by The First Continental Congress to help financeRead MoreShould Gambling Be Legalized? Essay958 Words   |  4 PagesGambling has become a major industry in the United States. In 2014 American casinos earned almost $38 billion, an increase of more than $5 billion over ten years (Scwhartz, 2015). Part of the increase comes from more states allowing commercial gambling. Since 2005 Florida, Kansas, Maryland, Ohio and Pennsylvania have all legalized casinos. However, gambling has negative side effects. In 2012 5.77 million problem gamblers existed in the country costing states $60.6 million (Marotta, Bahan, RynoldsRead MoreGambling in The Bahamas: Should it Be Legalized? 1821 Words   |  7 PagesBahamians about their views on gambling. The referendum asked Bahamians if they supported the regularization and taxation of web shop gaming. As noted in the results, the mass of the Bahamian people voted no against the referendum. Today, the gambling issue has reawakened and Bahamians are now in a fight against the laws of their country. Several Bahamians believe that the law discriminates against Bahamians because it prohibits Bahamians from owning and legally gambling in casinos within in their homelandRead MoreShould Sports Be Legalized?978 Words   |  4 PagesSome jobs would also be created if online gambling was legalized. Many of the existing online gambling sites would move their operations to the United States, while other sites wou ld be newly created in here. The jobs created would range from computer programmers to customer service jobs (Rousu). Our economy is always looking for new jobs to decrease the unemployment rate. This is a great way to lower unemployment and increase the economy at the same time. In Canada, the provinces experience additionalRead MoreLegalized Gambling Essay919 Words   |  4 PagesLegalized Gambling Have you ever wagered on a game? If so you were gambling and should have been fined. Gambling should be legalized in the state of Florida. The lawmakers, who have decided that it is evil for you and me to gamble, have justified it as a means to scam billions from citizens in order to compensate for their mismanagement of tax money. First they waste what they collect in taxes and then recover the wasted billions with gambling scams to get more, much more. AddingRead More Gambling Addiction Essay1116 Words   |  5 PagesGambling Addiction   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Gambling addiction is an issue found in numerous areas where gambling is legal. People who are addicted to gambling, also know as problem gamblers, face many health risks including depression, suicidal thoughts, loss of sleep, loss of appetite, migraine and anxiety in addition to marriage breakdown, problems at work and bankruptcy (9). About 2 percent of adults are thought to be problem gamblers (1). In today’s society this costly addiction is not often considered toRead Morelegalizing gambling983 Words   |  4 Pages Legalizing Casino Gambling in Texas Persuasive Speech Outline Legalizing Casino Gambling in Texas Specific Purpose Statement: To persuade my class about why legalizing casino gambling in Texas is for the better. Thesis Statement: Legalizing casino gambling in the state of Texas would enhance society and will be beneficial for the entire state. Organizational Pattern: Problem-Solution Introduction I. Did you know that gambling generates more revenue thanRead MoreGambling Outline Essay912 Words   |  4 PagesNick Cortese Research Outline Gambling Thesis: Gambling in society has detrimental effects to people in United States. Topic: I. There are certain types of gambling that people should be aware of. A. Gambling is any bet you make that involves chance, a stake, and there is a pay-off. â€Å"Here is the definition of gamble – to play at any game of chance for stakes, to bet on an uncertain outcome† (Brown). â€Å"The following three elements must be present for something

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Practices Of Securitisation Of Islam And Muslims - 1196 Words

PART III: PRACTICES OF SECURITISATION OF ISLAM AND MUSLIMS IN THE ETHIOPIAN STATE 3.1 Introduction In the previous parts the discussions on the theoretical framework of the securitisation theory as it applies to Islam and Muslims, and the international perspectives of governmentality of Muslims as well regional categorizations as the illustrations of governmentality have presented. In the subsequent sections discussions turn to the securitisation of Islam, and governmentality of Muslims in the Ethiopian state by thoroughly examining the existing challenges for the attainment of Muslim rights despite the changes in the political and social structure, and the disquieting narratives of the ‘global war on terror’ by zooming its impacts to†¦show more content†¦To a great extent confined in the northern highlands, and bit by bit creating xenophobic states of mind toward the outside world, Ethiopia was a nation shrouded with legends, making ways ready for expanded interest among its European co-religionists—who made vivid accounts of the Prester John, a myste rious Christian kingdom in Africa (Beckingham Hamilton, 1996). Like Christianity, Islam made an unexpected arrival in Ethiopia in 615 with the first Islamic hijira sometime called Axumitehijra. Constituting a place of refuge for the persecuted early Muslim believers, the event was essential for building strong relations between Ethiopia and the rising Islamic religion. The Prophet s gratitude was communicated in the expression; leave the Abyssinians alone, as long as they do not take offensive, and Ethiopia was therefore perceived as a sovereign state, regarded and excluded from military campaigns (Carmichael, 1996). While Christians and Muslims in Ethiopia originally remained relatively standing apart from each other—with the Christian kingdom restricted toward the northern highlands and Islam venturing into the south-eastern parts of today s Ethiopia—contact expanded in the thirteenth century with a gradually conflictual patterns. The hostile relationship peaked in 1529 with the conquest of Imam Ahmed

Compare and Contrast paper - 911 Words

A critical viewer is always beaten by a critical reader. This opinion has changed however, after seeing the movie and afterwards reading the story of â€Å"Gravestone Made of Wheat† and the movie â€Å" Sweet Land† which is derived from the same story. The charming love story tells of the deep love between the two main characters in the story, Inge and Olaf. The story tells of how they fought for the love that they had for each other. The film gives a vivid scenery of the story and gives justice to the idea of the writer. It shows how people could discriminate in terms of origin and culture. However, the depiction of Olaf as a man who will stand by his woman until the end justified this kind of mentality among almost all peoples from different†¦show more content†¦It disturbs the mind, it motivates insightful ideas to make questions as to why people behave the way they do and why things happen unexpectedly. The crafty transposition from short story to fi lm was so much so that the cinematic effects and techniques were strategically presented. The film is just as colorful as the mind of its director. The important value that the writer wanted to impart to his readers never missed a point in the film. In fact, the director made it a point to make it the most exciting part of the film. Despite their having been married, the aloofness of Olaf and Inge to each other is what makes the story totally distinct from other love stories. And yet, how did this love become so powerful? The writer’s mind is as powerful as well, because he was able to justify this through the twists and turns in the events of the story. The conclusion of the story gives the reader and the viewer something to ponder upon. This is where the power of the writer really came out. People generalize. They are judgmental. But there are exceptional loves as well. Something that begins morally, intellectually, and in reality, spiritually. The story just made the reactor wonder if it is still possible for people to practice the highest degree of restraint and morality towards each other, but still choose to be together in theShow MoreRelatedCompare and Contrast Paper1905 Words   |  8 Pagesï » ¿ Compare and Contrast Paper on Christian Counseling Methods By: John M Shisler For: CCOU 201 – D10 Summer 2014 Introduction Christian counselors are doing God’s work and must use the Spiritual Gifts with which they were blessed to be able to reach their clients. While it may be difficult to always reach a client right away, when a Christian counselor can be effective and help someone understand what God desires for them, it can be a very fulfilling and satisfying experience. But the ChristianRead MoreCompare and Contrast Theories Paper2924 Words   |  12 Pagesï » ¿ Compare and Contrast Theories Paper Ashlie Wilson EDUC 624 May 24, 2015 Abraham Maslow suggested that for students to have energy for learning, their basic personal needs must be met.(Jones, V., Jones L. 2013) Maslow described human needs as ordered in a prepotent hierarchy (McLeod, S. 2007).The hierarchy of human needs model was shown that basic human needs started at the lower level, general needs, and proceeded upward to more complex needs, and can onlyRead MorePolicy Analysis Iii- Compare and Contrast Paper809 Words   |  4 PagesPolicy Analysis III- Compare and Contrast Paper Brandy Alston University of Phoenix Criminal Justice Management Theory and Practice CJA/464 Professor Leroy Hendrix October 10, 2013 Policy Analysis III- Compare and Contrast Paper The reason for policy analysis reflects around the assessment of policies from the government by critiquing the failures and successes. 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I am going to give brief summaries of each book and also share where I think both of these books have agreed on certain themes, as well as where the have disagreed. â€Å"The Art of Dying: Living Fully Into The Life to Come†, written by Rob Moll, is a comprehensive book that tacklesRead MoreComparison and Contrast1409 Words   |  6 PagesAllah Professor: Dr.Bahman Amani Prepared by: Akbar Akbari Place: IAU Maraghe Date: May 6th 2010 ⠝â€" Definition: To compare is to show how items are alike. To contrast is to show how items are different. Thus comparison and contrast involve pointing out the similarities or differences between two (or more) items. In deciding what to compare or contrast, you will want to make sure that the items share points in common. Thus, the items compared are usually the same kind or class of thing

Essay on Jealousy By William Shakespeare s Othello Essay Example For Students

Essay on Jealousy By William Shakespeare s Othello Essay Jealousy In Othello Jealousy brings out the worst in people and that is particularly true with leaders, given their far-reaching authority and influence. When jealousy arises, leaders lose focus, respect, and their leadership abilities suffer as do their organization skills. These negative aspects of jealousy are present in Shakespeare’s tragic hero Othello, and was the cause of his ultimate downfall. In William Shakespeare’s Othello, jealousy is a central theme and tragic flaw possessed by the main characters Iago, Othello, and Roderigo. This intrinsic characteristic is the basis for conflict and tragedy throughout the course of the play and is the cause of the deaths of innocent individuals. Jealousy is a theme introduced at the beginning of Othello by Roderigo, a wealthy man infatuated with Desdemona. Roderigo’s infatuation first manifests itself when he hires Iago to assist him in obtaining a possible courtship with Desdemona. As Iago informs Roderigo of Desdemona and Othello’s wedlock, he sparks a flicker of jealousy in Roderigo. Roderigo’s jealousy drives him to notify Brabantio, Desdemona’s father, about the marriage by ridiculing Othello for his race: â€Å"As partly I find it is – that your fair daughter / At this odd-een and dull watch o’th night / Transported with no worse nor better guard / But with a knave of common hire, a gondolier / To the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor / If this be known to you and your allowance / We then have done you bold and saucy wrongs.† (1.1. 123-129). Roderigo uses his knowledge of Brabantio’s racism as an attempt to obliterate Desdemona and Othello’s relationship by emphasizing the fact that Othello is a Moor and Desdemona is fair-skinned. Roderigo is fully aware of the rage and di. .ed in the extreme† (5.2. 402-406) Othello realizes how much his jealousy was able to consume him, and agrees he is no longer suitable as the general of the Venice army. Once Othello is aware of the fact that Desdemona was in fact pure and did not have an affair with Cassio, he is overwhelmed with grief. Othello states that he can no longer live without his true love Desdemona, as life would not be the same without her. Jealousy resulted in the downfall of Shakespeare’s tragic hero Othello, as the actions that manifested from his jealous behaviour caused him to lose the single most important person in his life, Desdemona. Jealousy controlled the behaviour and thoughts of characters Roderigo, Iago, and Othello, causing them to act irrationally. Jealousy consumed the virtues and reputation Othello had worked hard to develop and led to his personal and professional ruin.

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

John Singleton Copleys Watson and the Shark Essay Example For Students

John Singleton Copleys Watson and the Shark Essay One interpretation of Watson and the Shark that takes some precedence over the rest was appended to the painting itself, probably by its owner. The label describes the painting as shewing that a high sense of INTEGRITY and RECTITUDE with a firm reliance on an over ruling PROVIDENCE are the sources of public and private virtue honours and success (see Miles 165). Watsons personal history, and his painful rise from an orphan to a major political force, adequately reflects this sentiment (see Masur 427). Other interpretations of the painting are rather comprehensively outlined by Louis Masur (437-54). In terms of the art theory of the day, as mentioned above,  Copley  painted a historical scene that would invite its viewers to alter their conception of what constituted history (Masur 437). The altered sense of history is democratized, allowing the viewer to see art as reflective of her or his reality and as potentially participatory (I too could be one of those noble seamen!). Of course, this is only the most rudimentary, and perhaps reductive, interpretation of the work. Masur further delineates approaches to the painting as loosely categorized as philosophical, political, and racial (439). The philosophical reading is based on religious connotations. Citing such sources as Raphael s The Miraculous Draught of Fishes and St. Michael and the Dragon, and Rubens The Miraculous Draught of Fishes and Jonah Thrown into the Sea, critics have generally read the painting as a treatment of salvation or of the struggle between man and nature. (5) Politically, the painting evokes the American Revolution. In social interpretations, critics have found the prominent placement of the black sailor in the painting to be one of the most important representations of a black person in all of eighteenth-century Western art (Masur 446). According to Masur, such readings may be alternately emblematic of  Copleys racism, in that the black sailor is merely a token presence, or of  Copley s statement on black identity and liberty (446; see also 446-49). Although much has been written on Melvilles familiarity with classical and European art, as they comprise the bulk of his personal collection and literary references, Melville displayed a considerable interest in American arts and artists (Robillard 26). Given Melvilles interest in art, it is very likely that he saw and took appreciative note of  Copleys Watson and the Shark as it hung in exhibition at the Boston Athenaeum in December of 1850. Biographical evidence places Melville at the Athenaeum while Watson and the Shark was on display. According to the Boston Evening Transcript of 20 December 1850,  Copleys painting was still on exhibition since its arrival in May. (6) Jay Leydas Melville Log reports the following event in that year, occurring shortly after the Transcript notice: BOSTON DECEMBER 30 Someone in the augmented Shaw household does some reading on M s current subject; charged on Shaws membership at the Boston Athenaeum: An Account of the Arctic Regions, with a History and description of the Northern Whale Fishery, by William Scoresby. (7) The 1850 exhibition of Watson and the Shark at the Boston Athenaeum coincided with Melvilles move from New York City to Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Melvilles wife and son spent Thanksgiving of that year in Boston in order to visit with her extended family, the Shaws. Being within striking distance of Boston, Melville apparently took advantage of his proximity to the Athenaeum to avail himself of its library collection. Borrowing on the account of his father-in-law, a founding member of the Boston Atheneaum, had been a habit of Melvilles well established by this point. Leydas Melville Log cites similar borrowings from the Boston Athenaeum since at least March of 1846. (8) Trips to the Athenaeum when Melville was in Boston seemed to be a common occurrence: When Melville and his wife visited the Shaw family in Boston during the 1840s, it would seem likely that he might take these occasions to visit the art exhibits at the Boston Athenaeum. [l he may have known quite a few details about the art collection through the exhibition catalogs regularly issued by the Athenaeum (Robillard 27). Although there is no direct documentary evidence as to whether or not Melville himself made the December 30 visit to the Athenaeum, it seems likely that he was the one to have borrowed such a book. There is little doubt that Melville knew the Scoresby text. Indeed, he cites it as an example of cetological accuracy: f the Right Whale, the best outline pictures are in Scoresby (NN MD, 265). Melville also tellingly comments here, it is by such pictures only that you can derive anything like a truthful idea of the living whale seen by his living hunters (265-66). Given that Melvilles eventual use of Scoresby s book should hinge on its pictorial content, the author may well have noticed the dramatic sea scene depicted in Watson and the Shark, which was hanging in the Athenaeum when he borrowed the Scoresby book. Indeed, Melville had a singular connection to both the Athenaeums art collection and  Copleythrough his own family. According to  John  Gretchko, Allan Melvill purchase a share in May or June of 1807 becoming a founding member, and Melvilles grandfather or uncle Thomas Melvill, it is unclear which, purchased a miniature painting there in 1828. (9) That same year, a painting of Melvilles grandfather, Major Thomas Melvill, hung in the Athenaeums yearly exhibition. Hershel Parker notes that, for Melville, family portraits became objects of intense reverence and curiosity. (10) Therefore, it seems credible that Melvillewho thought of his forebears as those in whose veins coursed the blood of the earl of Melville House and the blood of remoter noble and even royal ancestors (Parker 59)would have felt some abiding familial connection to the Boston Athenaeum. Moreover, Melvilles family also had a specific connection to  Copley. In 1762,  Copley  painted a watercolor-on-ivory miniature of Melville s great-great-aunt Deborah Scollay Melvill. (11) Yet Melville also had a particular connection of his own to  Copley  at this point in his life. In August 1850, more than midway into his composition of Moby-Dick, Melville wrote Hawthorne and his Mosses, a review of Hawthornes Mosses from an Old Manse. It appeared in Evert Duyckinck s Literary World on 17 and 24 August 1850. Within Hawthornes book is the short tale Drownes Wooden Image. Though Melville does not mention it in his review of Mosses, could well have influenced Melvilles thinking (Robillard 15). As Rita Gollin and  John  Idol have noted, one of the main characters in this tale is  John  Singleton  Copley, whom Hawthorne characterizes as a man of good will, sensitivity, and insight. (12)  Copley, in the tale, interacts with Drowne (another historical personality) as Drowne creates his life s masterpiece: a ships figurehead in the form of a beautiful woman. One can imagine that the object Drowne is crafting in the story would strike a chord with Melville, never far removed in thought from his seafaring days. Melville, ever the student of art, would most likely have stowed this fact away for future reference. Also, Melville greatly respected Hawthorne, who has dropped germinous seeds within my soul (Melville Hawthorne, 146), (13) Thus, it is most probable that Melville took special notice of Hawthornes inclusion of the New England artist in the story. Hawthorne, too, provided Melville with a connection to the Boston Athenaeum. Hawthorne saw paintings, sketches and statues in the Athenaeum and read reviews of the annual Athenaeum exhibits (Gollin and Idol 23) as early as 1836. Arlin Turner notes that Hawthorne borrowed numerous books from the Athenaeum library, and wanted more access than he received, as he did not have membership in the Boston Athenaeum library to enable him to check out books (14) as did Melville. The Athenaeum was liable to be at least one point of common ground between Melville and Hawthorne, one that they could speak of when they saw one another, as they did throughout the composition of Moby-Dick. Hawthorne and Melville had a shared link in their patronage of the Boston Athenaeums library; they both had an abiding interest in the visual arts; and a nautical painting by a famous artist featured in Hawthornes Mosses, recently reviewed by Melville, was hanging in the gallery of that very library. The convergenc e of all these factors suggest that the exhibition of  Copleys Watson and the Shark at the Athenaeum in 1850 would have been a very attractive draw for Melville. His family, social, and artistic connections to the Athenaeum make it likely that the gallery and library were part of his routine when in Boston. The evidence strongly suggests that Melville visited the Boston Athenaeum while Watson and the Shark was on exhibition, a painting connected to the authors art, his friends, and his family. If he did see the work, there is little doubt that it is an image that would have stuck with him as he pondered Moby-Dick. And if so, it is likely that  Copleys painting played into Melville s vast use of art in Moby-Dick. How would Melville interpret Watson and the Shark and how would that interpretation of the painting affect the writing of Moby-Dick? Obviously, the answers to these questions are a matter of some speculation. However, an argument by analogy to Melvilles use of other pictorial sources would serve well here. The most ambitious model of such a project to date is Robert Wallaces dissection of the relationship between Melville and painter J. M. W. Turner in Melville and Turner: Spheres of Love and Fright. Wallace s argument is that Melville made Turner his own in the process of writing Moby-Dick (Melville and Turner 1). Wallace explores how Melvilles exposure to art (and to Turner) through reading, conversation, and visits to galleries (Melville and Turner 75) came to fruition in Moby-Dick. Wallace then identifies Melvilles personal appropriation of art and artists in the context of the American culture of which he was a part (Melville and Turner 309). Moving farther afield, Wallace exami nes the undocumented spiritual connection between Melville and Turner as they both dive deeply into the imaginative spheres of love and fright, and display their essential brotherhood (Melville and Turner 477). It is in this last vein that an educated guess can be made about Melvilles perception of Watson and the Shark. That Melville would have been impressed by  Copleys painting, had he seen Watson and the Shark, is fairly safe to assume. The visceral mood of the piece would find an affinity in Melvilles artistic, postpicturesque (Wallace Melville and Turner, 479) sensibilities. Masur anticipates this connection when he finds that the painting, to apply classical terms commonplace in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century criticism of the arts and used in another context decades later by Herman Melville, who knew something of sailors and sea creatures, instructed through terror and pity (438-39). Roger Stein, in his publication of the Whitney Museums exhibition, Seascape and the American Imagination, also finds this kind of connection between Melville and  Copleys painting of Watsons misfortune. (15) Stein notes that the figures of Watson and the shark remind us of the possibility, as Herman Melville would later put it, that the invisible spheres were formed in fright (20). That paintings with whic h Melville was impressed were woven into his fiction is an established fact, as Wallace amply demonstrates. Therefore, as it is likely that Melville saw  Copleys Watson and the Shark at the Boston Athenaeum, the painting may have in some way informed the writing of Moby-Dick. At the very least, Melville probably would have recognized in  Copleys painting the sources from which the artist drew, given Melvilles steeping in the Old Masters. He may well have recognized that the arrangement of figures images of men in boats, such as Rubenss and Raphaels The Miraculous Draught of Fishes and Rubenss Jonah and the Whale (Miles 165). This connection to depictions of biblical stories of seafarers would jibe quite nicely with Melvilles composition of Moby-Dick since the book was pervasively influenced by the Bible (Parker 699). Additionally, Melville would likely have been drawn to the figures themselves. The figure in the bow of the boat with the boathook is obviously reminiscent of harpooner on a whaleboat. The racial mix represented in the painting also would have spoken to Melvilles own experiences. However, as opposed to recent readings of  Copleys painting as a self-conscious attempt to probe the meaning of race (Masur 448), Melville would more likely have seen a reflection of his own experience on shipboard. While the Pequod may at times appear as a somewhat idealized view of racial harmony aboard a whaleship, Briton Cooper Busch argues that in reality black and white, foreign and American, foremast hands were forced to tolerate each others existence in such circumstances, simply in order to survive. (16) At the very least,  Copleys choices for the seamen reflect the heterogeneity common among contemporary ships crews. Indeed,  Copley  himself strove for accuracy and realism (Masur 447) in th e painting. Accordingly, Melville may well have been struck by its verisimilitude. Copleys painting most directly engages the question of the relationship between the black sailor and Watson in the painting to the monkey-rope episode between Ishmael and Queequeg. At first glance, in that the black sailor in the painting grasps the rope, but Watson does not, the work may signal a disconnection between the races. However, the rope linking the black sailor and Watson is clearly the source of the boys salvation in the painting. Whether read in a context of racial politics or as a meditation on religious or secular salvation, the scene in the painting makes a strong link between the rescuer and the victim. Howard Vincent has similarly argued that the monkey-rope in Moby-Dick becomes a superb symbol of human brotherhood. (17) The Siamese connexion with a plurality of mortals (NN MD, 320) that Ishmael comes to recognize in his own connection to Queequeg is equally represented in the black seamans connection to Watson. The association between  Copleys painting and the monkey-rope episode becomes most closely twined in Melvilles following description of the shark episode in Moby-Dick: And right in among those sharks was Queequeg; who often pushed them aside with his floundering feet. Accordingly, besides the monkey-rope, with which I now and then jerked the poor fellow from too close a vicinity to the maw of what seemed a particularly ferocious sharkhe was provided with still another protection. Suspended over the side in one of the stages, Tashtego and Daggoo continually flourished over his head a couple of keen whale-spades, wherewith they slaughtered as many of the sharks as they could reach. (NN MD, 321) The accumulation of details seems too much to be simply coincidence. Like Watson of the painting, Queequeg is among those sharks. Watson has lost a foot to the shark while Queequeg pushed them aside with his floundering feet. A rope, controlled aboard ship, has been tossed to the helpless Watson to save him much as Ishmael jerked the poor fellow from the maw of shark. The image of the sharks open maw itself is found prominently in  Copleys painting. Also, just like the two would-be rescuers who reach over the gunwales for Watson in the painting, Tashtego and Daggoo are suspended over the side. Finally, the seaman brandishing the boathook over the shark in  Copleys painting is in the same relative position as Tashtego and Daggoo as they continually over his head flourished a couple of keen whale-spades. This presentation of the shark in Moby-Dick closely parallels readings of the shark in Watson and the Shark. The shark in  Copleys work, on the strictly narrative level, is the animal that attacked Brook Watson. So too, in Moby-Dick, are the sharks a simple reality, a natural by-product of the whaling industry. But, the shark in  Copleys painting has also been read in a religious context of resurrection and salvation (Jaffe 18), as Leviathan a sea-dragon associated with the day of salvation when the sea-dragon will be killed (18) and the soul resurrected. The shark, then, is the obstacle to salvation. Old Fleeces famous Sermon to the Sharks also represents the shark as an obstacle to salvation. As they are by natur wery Woracious (NN MD, 295), the sharks animal voraciousness keeps them from taking Fleeces meaning. Of course, this equation has a human counterpart in Stubb, who fails to heed the very sermon he compels Old Fleece to make as he indulges in his own gluttony. It is this voracious, bestial nature of the shark that is most commonly read by critics. Not much critical appreciation of the shark episode goes beyond Vincents early analysis of Stubbs banquet and the sharks feast ironic commentaries on each other, a grotesque antiphonal (233). The parallel between the sharks unmitigated ferocity and humanitys failure to govern the animal in itself has been widely acknowledged by Melville scholars. (18) Hill presents the idea nicely by asking if Melville suggesting that our own sharkish natures make self-governance and the consequent release of the angelic just as remote as in the animal kingdom? (257). Such sentiments are certainly suggested in the philosophical readings of Watson and the Shark. It is the shark that Watson needs deliverance from, just as Stubb does, whether he realizes it or not. It is a near certainty that Melville saw  Copleys Watson and the Shark at the Boston Athenaeum. The evidence points to Melville having a familiarity with the painting. Melville was deeply involved in the visual arts. This involvement is clear throughout his writing, and certainly in Moby-Dick. During the composition of Moby-Dick, Melville encountered a fictional  Copley  in his reading of Hawthornes Mosses, a work by which he was intensely moved. Melville had connections, both familial and through Hawthorne, with the Boston Athenaeum, where the painting was displayed during Melvilles writing of Moby-Dick. Documentary evidence suggests Melvilles presence at the Boston Athenaeum during the exhibition of Watson and the Shark in 1850. Finally, there are details both narrative and figurative in the text that are strongly tied to narrative and thematic details in the painting. This accumulation of the evidence strongly suggests that Melville knew  Copleys Watson and the Shark and b rought that knowledge to bear in the drafting of Moby-Dick.

Sunday, April 19, 2020

Magdalena And Balthasar Essays (973 words) - Steven Ozment

Magdalena And Balthasar The letters of Magdalena and Balthasar give us a glimpse into the lives of a merchant couple in 16th century Nuremberg, Germany. Renaissance Nuremberg was a city much like Florence, full of culture and based on a strong merchant economy. The only difference was that while Florence was predominately Catholic, Nurembergs residents were Protestant (Patrouch, 2-13-01). In this city, the plague ended the lives of thousands and this couple was alive to see the suffering it created. This caused two reactions in them. One was that of fear; a fear that they too would die from the plague and so they are both very careful with their health. The second was a vision of a God that could both punish and save them from damnation. In the letters of this book we discover how a Protestant couple in Renaissance Germany dealt with the illness and suffering that their loving God had bestowed upon them. Between 1560 and 1584, Nuremberg lost thousands of its residents to an epidemic that was sweeping Europe. This was the reason for the couples preoccupation with purgative health care methods such as periodic bleedings, salve solutions, and bathing and drinking spring waters such as those of Lucca, Italy. In the introduction of this book, Ozment states that Magdalena and Balthasar are devotees of purgative medicine, in search of effective prophylaxis against the ragging maladies and diseases of their age (Ozment, 14). Due to this fear of sickness and death, Magdalena and Balthsar are fanatics of the medical remedies of the time. Through these letters we can see that religion played a major role in the lives of the couple. As we read in the introduction, they seem to have a love-hate relationship with God, their Afflicter and Redeemer (Ozment, 14). Throughout their letters we will discover the strong beliefs that this couple had in the medicine of their time and the God that they both feared and loved. Magdalena is the one who was exposed most to this deterioration that was occurring in Nuremberg. Numerous times she remorsefully mentioned the news of a lost friend or relative in her letters to Balthasar. Once while Balthasar was in Altdorf Magdalena wrote, I must report to you a death among our friends in every letter I write; I wish it were not so (M. Paumgartner, 113). Even though this is a happy time in their lives because she has just found out that they will have a child, they are not sure whether this is a blessing or a curse, for now there is one more of them at risk. And later we learn that this epidemic did not discriminate the old or young and even little Balthasar dies at the young age of 10. While away in Ausburg, Balthasar receives news that little Balthasar was very ill. Magdalena wrote, I long for you under this cross which God has made us bear by afflicting little Balthasar. She goes on to say, May eternal God add his grace to the medicine, so that little Balthasar will have recovered by the time you return. (M. Paumgartner, 98). This is a perfect example of the vision the couple had of God. Even though He was the merciless God that had bestowed such a horrible sickness on their boy, He was also the all- powerful God that could remove it and restore the health of their only son. This is the love-hate relationship that Ozment mentions in his introduction. The couple loved God and constantly praise him throughout their correspondence but they never fail to recognize that He is the one who has created such suffering for them. In a letter to Balthasar while away in Frankfurt Magdalena writes how little Balthasar definitely has a deformity in his neck. She says that she has just taken him to the doctor and he believes there is nothing that will cure him, the only thing that will help is some salve and she goes on to say, May God help make it work! (M. Paumgartner, 90). Statements like this display to us hope that Magdalena and Balthasar had in both God and medicine. In a letter from Balthasar to Magdalena, he says

Monday, April 13, 2020

Essay Topics For Tourism - How to Write the Best Essay Topics

Essay Topics For Tourism - How to Write the Best Essay TopicsThe topic of essays for tourism is one that is not very easy to find in the history of education. Why is this? It has to do with the basic needs of these subjects that should be completely kept out of the curriculum. If we were to make them so, then education would come to a standstill.You may have already heard that interest topics are usually done first in education, which makes sense, since they are of utmost importance. They ought to be an integral part of every subject and they should form a part of the reading material that students are required to use. Therefore, teaching them in essays for tourism is quite wrong, especially if you do not want to go in for a standard format. The students are just not capable of thinking about such subjects. If you put them in the essays, then they would be completely distracted and would not be able to think properly about the topic, because it is in such a context that they are requ ired to think.Even if you wish to use a formal style and let your students read the essays, you will find that it would not be too suitable. It would not be possible to have the student read the essay on his own. This is because they would not be able to understand it and would only be able to think about it, thus you will find them not thinking properly.When you are making these subject essays, then you will need to tell the students what you are trying to teach them, which is basically their background knowledge. You will also need to tell them what the purpose of their essays is, in other words how can they help in learning the subject.When they have answered all the questions to your satisfaction, you can then explain to them certain topics that are part of the curriculum of tourism. Then, you can provide the students with the necessary forms to be used while filling up the forms for completing their essays. You can even ask them to write a brief essay describing some of the imp ortant points in the subject and even give the students some tips. You will find this not too difficult for the students as they will just want to get something out of their education.After you have given them all the details that they need, you will be ready to start writing the essay topics. There are several ways in which you can do this. You can write the essay with the help of your teacher's or you can consult the internet and find the best essay topics for your student.The best option would be to follow the method that you found most suitable. Of course, you will have to make sure that the essay topics are written with the help of essay software that will help you design them easily. Once you have finished your assignment, then you can simply let the students mark them off as they want.

Saturday, March 14, 2020

Feminist Movement in America essays

Feminist Movement in America essays In the nineteenth century, women were compelled to precise social duties in male dominated societies. Their jobs were to take care of the home, raise the children, make sure there was peace in the family, follow a husbands orders, and make the home a comfortable and carefree place to live. In Kate Chopins The Awakening, three main characters, Edna Pontellier, Madame Adele Ratignolle, and Mademoiselle Reisz, portray particular roles that either establish or contradict these social dichotomies. Each womans representation of character in the nineteenth century helps illustrate the feminist movement in America, a continuous struggle that has helped shaped the lives of women in todays society. Edna Pontellier, the main character of the story, is a woman who does not only acknowledge her own wants and desires, but also has the strength and courage to act on them. Edna is a handsome, engaging woman who is valued by society for her physical appearance. Breaking through the role that has been appointed to her by society, she discovers her own identity independent of her husband and children. At the beginning of the novel, Edna is comfortable in her marriage to Leonce Pontellier, and is unaware of her own feelings and ambitions. Author Barbara Welters The Cult of True Womanhood presents four cardinal virtues that women were thought to have in the nineteenth century, one of them being purity. When a woman married she was to be pure until her wedding night, and once she joined in this union with her husband, she belonged to him. Welter implies in her essay that marriage was, literally, an end to innocence. She told not to question this dilemma, but simply to accept it (Welter 118). As time progresses, Edna Pontellier begins to see her marriage to Leonce as a life full of responsibility and unwanted duties, rather than a life full of passion. She no long...

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Business costs Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Business costs - Assignment Example For example, a firm always prefer to produce any unit of output who’s per unit marginal revenue exceeds the marginal cost of the unit. By doing so, the firm would gain more revenue by selling that unit. On the other hand, if the marginal cost of a unit of output is more than its marginal revenue; in that case, the firm avoids producing that unit. If the firm produces such unit, it would incur loss rather than profit on the unit. 2- What do you understand by the term economies of scale? Reductions in per unit cost resulting from increase in market size and increase in firm are called as economies of scale. Any unit cost reduction that occurs when a firm increase its production base or aggregately, the market in which that firm is producing its units, increase. Over that period of time; globally as well as locally, the firms and the markets are increasing. This increase in both is mostly contributed by the latest means of technology, which are mostly used nowadays in the process of production. For example, previously much work was carried out manually as a result, a sufficient amount of resources were consumed. Thanks to machinsation and computerisation that have sufficiently added in the process of economies of scale. ... enue- totally equalling with the total costs- or in total units of production, the cost of produced units offsets the revenue obtained by the sale of units. Some reasons may justify a company keep producing units even it is making loss. First, the loss, occurred by the break-even point or near to that point, most of time doesn’t last for a considerable period of time. The company may be experiencing a seasonal variation in the demand of a particular unit. As soon as that period of seasonal variation in demand ends, the company again observes profits- revenue exceeding costs. 4- What market power may large firms enjoy? How and why may a government seek to limit this? Market power is associated with the behaviour of a firm and the way firms affect competitive conditions and prices in a market (Bourdet, 1991). The way a firm adopts its supply of goods and services production mechanism and its aggregate strategy towards its prices determines its market power. For example, if a fir m has 70 percent market shares in the sale of a particular commodity. Under this condition, it would not be incorrect to say that the firm has sufficient market power to affect and control the prices of that commodity. A government via legislation can restrict to limit the market power of the firm. By enacting a particular legislation and implementing it, the government would become in a position to limit the firm’s market power. The main reason for limiting the market power of the firm is to allow the competitive market conditions. The competitive market conditions benefit producers and the consumers as it would protect consumers who would pay higher costs if the firm limit the required level of commodities in market. 5- Consumer gain as much from small business as from large ones. Analyse

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Influences on Providers Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Influences on Providers - Assignment Example Healthcare expenditure is covered by several sources of funding including out-of-pocket payments where individuals pay for services through deductibles and copayments (Musgrave, 2006). Another source is the private health insurance coverage like the point-of-service plans (PPOs) and health maintenance organizations plans (HMOs). The US government expenditure on healthcare is incurred through government health plans like Medicare, Medicaid, Military Health system and Children’s health insurance program (CHIP) (Kronenfeld, 2002). Unemployment rate in the US has increased over the recent past. Unemployed individuals increase the financial costs of the health care providers since they may not be able to pay the deductibles and copayments. The high unemployment rate will increase the federal spending on Medicaid health care program (Sultz & Young, 2011). Increase in employment will lead to more employer financed healthcare insurance thus reducing the costs of government sponsored programs. Employees are more willing to purchase healthcare insurance once they are offered benefits like income tax allowances by the employee (Sultz & Young, 2011). About 46.3 million citizens representing 15.4 percent of total population have no insurance coverage. The number of uninsured citizens has been increasing due to lack of employment and ineligibility in government sponsored health care schemes (Sultz & Young, 2011). When the uninsured are unable to pay for the full medical costs, such costs are added to the provider’s costs. The increase in healthcare insurance will lead to early detection of the medical conditions thus a reduction in the overall medical costs incurred by the healthcare providers will be possible (Musgrave, 2006). The US economic downturn has increased the overall unemployment rate in the economy. The recent economic meltdown and financial crisis have led to

Friday, January 31, 2020

Automobile and Large Mass Essay Example for Free

Automobile and Large Mass Essay There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. So Lewis asked his father: â€Å"Dad, what’s that grey smoke above our cars? † Lewis’ father was a little surprised by the question, but answered: â€Å"Well, Lewis, it’s called pollution. † There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. So Lewis asked his father: â€Å"Dad, what’s that grey smoke above our cars? † Lewis’ father was a little surprised by the question, but answered: â€Å"Well, Lewis, it’s called pollution. † There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. So Lewis asked his father: â€Å"Dad, what’s that grey smoke above our cars? † Lewis’ father was a little surprised by the question, but answered: â€Å"Well, Lewis, it’s called pollution. † There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. So Lewis asked his father: â€Å"Dad, what’s that grey smoke above our cars? † Lewis’ father was a little surprised by the question, but answered: â€Å"Well, Lewis, it’s called pollution. † â€Å"Pollution? What’s pollution? † asked Lewis, waiting intrigued for his father’s answer. â€Å"Well, for example, it’s that grey smoke you can see above our cars. Cars that run on petrol or diesel give off gasses into the atmosphere, which are very bad for all living beings and the planet too. Today you can see a lot of the grey smoke because it hasn’t rained for a long time,† answered his father. There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. So Lewis asked his father: â€Å"Dad, what’s that grey smoke above our cars? † Lewis’ father was a little surprised by the question, but answered: â€Å"Well, Lewis, it’s called pollution. † â€Å"Pollution? What’s pollution? † asked Lewis, waiting intrigued for his father’s answer. â€Å"Well, for example, it’s that grey smoke you can see above our cars. Cars that run on petrol or diesel give off gasses into the atmosphere, which are very bad for all living beings and the planet too. Today you can see a lot of the grey smoke because it hasn’t rained for a long time,† answered his father. There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a There was once a little boy of 6 years old called Lewis. One day, as he was looking out of the car window on his way to school, he discovered that a large mass of grey smoke was forming just above his dad’s car. Somewhat alarmed, Lewis looked at the other cars on the road to find out if they too had a cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. So Lewis asked his father: â€Å"Dad, what’s that grey smoke above our cars? † Lewis’ father was a little surprised by the question, but answered: â€Å"Well, Lewis, it’s called pollution. † â€Å"Pollution? What’s pollution? † asked Lewis, waiting intrigued for his father’s answer. â€Å"Well, for example, it’s that grey smoke you can see above our cars. Cars that run on petrol or diesel give off gasses into the atmosphere, which are very bad for all living beings and the planet too. Today you can see a lot of the grey smoke because it hasn’t rained for a long time,† answered his father. cloud of grey smoke chasing them. To Lewis’ surprise, all the cars travelling on the motorway had the grey smoke hovering around them. So Lewis asked his father: â€Å"Dad, what’s that grey smoke above our cars? † Lewis’ father was a little surprised by the question, but answered: â€Å"Well, Lewis, it’s called pollution. † â€Å"Pollution? What’s pollution? † asked Lewis, waiting intrigued for his father’s answer. â€Å"Well, for example, it’s that grey smoke you can see above our cars. Cars that run on petrol or diesel give off gasses into the atmosphere, which are very bad for all living beings and the planet too. Today you can see a lot of the grey smoke because it hasn’t rained for a long time,† answered his father. d by the question, but answered: â€Å"Well, Lewis, it’s called pollution. † â€Å"Pollution? What’s pollution? † asked Lewis, waiting intrigued for his father’s answer. â€Å"Well, for example, it’s that grey smoke you can see above our cars. Cars that run on petrol or diesel give off gasses into the atmosphere, which are very bad for all living beings and the planet too. Today you can see a lot of the grey smoke because it hasn’t rained for a long time,† answered his father. Lewis spent a while pondering on this, and began to put two and two together. If the grey smoke was bad, and it was all because of cars, then why were there so many cars on the road? â€Å"Dad,† said Lewis slowly, â€Å"If the grey smoke is pollution and is bad for us, why are we going to school in a car? † â€Å"So I can get to work on time, son. The bus or metro would make us late,† answered his father. It was Spring. As soon as the cold weather went, it came back again. The sun seemed ashamed to show his smily face for more than the odd morning. To top it all, loads of people were sick. A spectacular chucking-up bug was going around the school. If anyone looked so much as a bit pasty in class, the teacher would grab an empty litter bin and tell them to hold it close by. Minutes later the school secretary would be calling Little So and So’s mother and telling her to get over quickly and collect her sick child. The bug even got poor Isis, who was NEVER off school. Like everything else about her, Isis’s attendance record was usually perfect – but not this week, because there was no way she could come in. She texted Katie: â€Å"Poor me, I feel so rotten! Chucked up 6 times. Is that a world record? † Katie had so far escaped the bug. She was very careful about washing her hands and not going near anyone who coughed or spluttered. She asked her mother what could be done for Isis, and she suggested an ancient witch’s remedy made from mint leaves and mandrake’s root. ‘Sounds great,’ said Katie, â€Å"Why don’t witches cure everyone? ’

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Hamlet - The Theme of Revenge Essay example -- William Shakespeare

â€Å"Hamlet,† Critical Essay Alexander Pope believed that, â€Å"to be angry is to revenge the faults of others on ourselves.† I think this is pertinent to â€Å"Hamlet,† by William Shakespeare because the main character is portrayed to bring great mental suffering upon himself in his search for revenge. Shakespeare enhances the reader’s appreciation of the play by effectively conveying its theme of revenge through characterization and plot in addition to other literary techniques. â€Å"Hamlet,† tells the story of a Danish prince who aims to avenge his father’s murder after his ghost appears before Hamlet and reveals that he was murdered by his own brother. To Hamlet’s disgust, his uncle, Claudius, has stolen Hamlet’s place as King by marrying the prince’s mother, Gertrude. In Hamlet’s search for the truth, he makes the fatal error of stabbing Polonius, the King’s advisor. Polonius’ death causes his daughter, who is Hamlet’s former lover, to go insane. Polonius’ son, Laertes, decides to take revenge upon Hamlet for his father, and Claudius sees an opportunity to get rid of his nephew. He sets up a fencing match between Hamlet and Laertes, then poisons Hamlet’s drink and Laertes’ rapier. Hamlet needs verification of his uncle’s murder of the former king before he can take revenge upon him, as he has a fear of the metaphysical consequences of murdering a man who has done nothing wrong. He seems to be wary of his father’s ghost and the allegations it makes about Claudius’ regicide. The ghost first appears in the play before Horatio, who is Hamlet’s friend, and two guards of Elsinore castle. Hamlet is then told by his father’s ghost to avenge his death after he follows the spirit into the forest. In Elizabethan times, when Hamlet was writte... ...enges his father’s death, the consequences are harsh. He has to watch his mother die and realises he has used Laertes own weapon to kill him. His death is, of course, the saddest consequence of his revenge. Hamlet’s murder of Claudius improves the reader’s appreciation of the text as they understand that although Hamlet is moribund, he has avenged his father’s murder, which is what he set out to do in the first place. I think that â€Å"Hamlet,† is a thought provoking play. It made me think about what I would do in Hamlet’s situation, and how I would handle the burden of vengeance of a loved one’s murder. I believe that although times have changed significantly since the first performance of â€Å"Hamlet,† in 1607, the themes are still relevant to audiences today. Shakespeare effectively depicts many different aspects of revenge in an interesting and fascinating way.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Genetic Testing Controversies

Genetic Testing Controversies 1-12-11 Biology Genetic Testing, also known as DNA-based tests, is a new method of testing for genetic diseases or disorders. In the test the DNA molecule is examined and other tests include microscopic examination of chromosomes, for stained or fluorescent chromosomes. Genetic tests are used for carrier screening, newborn screening, identity testing, prenatal diagnostic testing, and prediction of disorders later in life such as Huntington’s or Alzheimer’s disease etc. Human Genome Project) Controversies today that genetic testing today faces is with the privacy, consents, equity and discrimination. The privacy of the information that is found may not be confidential between the patient and the doctor it may also be revealed to other people that are not involved in the issue. The controversies with consent are that should the insurance companies be allowed to have the information of medical records and family histories before granting permi ssion to anything. (Friesen, Tim.The Genetic Testing Controversy). The costs of some of these genetic tests are very expensive, some costing more than $1000. Another controversy is related with discrimination to the people shown by insurance companies, where they are discriminating on the people by the information which is received to them by genetic tests. Another example is where a woman who had applied to become an adoptive parent was denied due to a family history of Huntington’s disease which also made her susceptible to the disease. Friesen, Tim. The Genetic Testing Controversy) An advantage of Genetic testing is that it gives information about any disease or disorders a person may have and treat that person immediately for a cure. Another advantage is that these tests help to live a risk free life from the beginning, for example- Genetic testing are done on new born babies, which helps to identify any disorders from the beginning so treatment can be given immediately. Benefits of genetic testing) Another advantage of genetic testing is that there are fewer checkups and visits to the doctor if there is a history of a disease in a family. Another advantage is that if a person is genetically tested and the results are positive, they get to make â€Å"informed decisions† in their life. (Benefits of Gene Testing. National Cancer Institute) A disadvantage of genetic testing is that if a person is positive for a disease which cannot be cured completely, is still in a risk. Related essay: â€Å"Advantages and Disadvantages of Genetic Engineering†For example breast and ovarian cancers, you cannot get rid of each and every breast or ovary related cells. Even after the surgery, the risk is still there. Another disadvantage is many people after receiving their test results and testing positive for a disease, leads to depression, anxiety or anger for most people, mostly women in these cases. Another disadvantage of genetic testing is many people face discrimination in getting insurance, or employment due to the results of that person’s genetic test. Citation Pictures http://www. beltina. org/pics/genetic_testing. jpg

Monday, January 6, 2020

The Process of Decision Making Essay - 1122 Words

Organizational behavior helps managers to improve the organization in a good way. Decision making process is the one of the behavior in human organizational behavior. According to McShane and Von Glinow (2000), â€Å"decision making a conscious process of making choices among one or more alternatives with the intention of moving toward some desired state of affairs†. Decision making is a linear process and it includes six steps such as identifying the problems, gather and evaluate data, list and evaluate alternatives, select best action, implement the decision and getter feedback (refer to Figure 1 in Appendix 1). First step in decision making process is identifying the problems. As McShane and Von Glinow (2000) stated, a problem can be†¦show more content†¦As stated by Prasad (2008), the managers should identify the different choices available in order to get most acceptable outcome of a decision. From searching different alternatives the managers can evade blocks in operations as choices are suitable if a particular idea goes wrong. Khanka (2000) expresses the view that selections can developed from in many ways such as can get from sources like experience, do training other organizations, and take others ideas and suggestions related in problems. Furthermore to improve alternatives solution the managers may investigation the signs of a problem for clues or fall back on intuition or result that stated by Griffin and Moorhead (2010). For an example in marketing department a non-programmed decision is compulsory the manager have to produce alternatives for raise market share. As McSha ne and Von Glinow (2000) pointed out that in a programmed decision is a standard operations is not to generate choice but can take out from the documented that already saved. Next an organizer should search the mission of a decision. In other words they need to define what is to be accomplished by it (Quick Nelson, 2013). The decision criteria are important as mentioned by Dubrin (2002). The several criteria are consumers must aware of varies in quality of products, there not happen inflation, workers must consider the quality of improvements and lastly job satisfaction should not be reduce. Third process of decision making is list andShow MoreRelatedDecision Making Process776 Words   |  4 Pages| Decision Making Process | Choosing a College | | | 3/19/2012 | | It is never easy to make decisions in life, especially life changing decisions. The decision making process is a very difficult process that is used by everyone in one way or another. Some people may alter the decision making process in order to fit their own needs and their own personal circumstances, but there is a model that has been provided in order to show the basic steps. The decision making process modelRead MoreDecision Making Process1454 Words   |  6 PagesYou are a senior manager of â€Å"X† Ltd. You have to take a major decision. Discuss what decision you are making and all the factors you are going to consider. How you are going to make the decision? | | Unilever today is a trusted name in both Bangladesh and other parts of the world. Listening to the people, who buy our products, helped us to grow into one of the world s most successful consumer goods companies. In fact, 150 million times a day, someone somewhere chooses a Unilever product. In theRead MoreThe Decision-Making Process2267 Words   |  10 PagesTraditional Decision-Making Process 1 Making Rational Decisions 2 Problem Definition-Rational 3 Identify Decision Criteria-Rational 3 Weight the Criteria-Rational 3 Generate the Alternatives-Rational 4 Evaluate the Alternatives-Rational 4 Select the Optimal Solution-Rational 4 Making â€Å"Good Enough† Decisions 4 Making Intuitive Decisions 4 Making Creative Decisions 5 Global Decision Making 5 Ethical Decision Making 5 Key Aspects of the Management Process 6 Decision-Making in Today’s ChangingRead MoreDecision Making Process2237 Words   |  9 PagesDECISION-MAKING PROCESS: Decision-making process is a six step process. The stages can be summarized as: (1) identifying and diagnosing the problem, (2) generating alternative solutions, (3) evaluating alternatives, (4) choosing the best alternative, (5) implementing the decisions, and (6) evaluating the results. 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Organizations can easily miss the market, by not having the right intelligenceRead MoreThe Military Decision Making Process923 Words   |  4 PagesDecision making is identifying the problem, analyzing the problem, find solutions for the problem and decide the solution for the problem. This is the army definition of Decision making. â€Å"Decision making is knowing if to decide, then when and what to decide. It inc ludes understanding the consequence of decisions.†(FM101-5) The military decision-making process (MDMP) is â€Å"An iterative planning methodology to understand the situation and mission, develop a course of action, and produce an operation